If Not Here, Where?

"If you don't like living here," they say, "if you don't like living beneath this flag, you are free to live somewhere else."

The here they are talking about is the United States. The flag, of course, the stars and stripes of Saturday's fireworks extravaganza. But here is also Hawaiʻi. The state whose flag was once the flag of an independent nation.

Week In Surfing: July 4, 2015

As a child, of course, the fourth of July was always an exciting holiday. Sparklers were wielded in great loops, drawing our names in the darkness until they sputtered out and stabbed into water filled coffee cans. The neighbor boy up the street lit firecrackers and jumping jacks, which frightened me with their loud chaos.

Why We Need To Talk About Cameron Crowe's 'Aloha'

On the surface, the hullabaloo about Emma Stone's casting as hapa wahine Allison Ng in Cameron Crowe's Aloha might seem pretty ridiculous. It's only one movie, right? A fun summer love triangle rom-com set in a beautiful location and it's all just Hollywood fantasy anyway. Nobody actually thinks movies are real life, etc etc, so why is everybody so flipping angry? See also: don't we have more important things to worry about?

On April 7, the Hawaiʻi State Legislature gathered to honor the original crew of Hōkūleʻa, the working replica of an ancient Polynesian wa‘a kaulua (double-hulled voyaging canoe). Her name translates to Star of Gladness, but stands for so much more. Hōkūleʻa is Hawaiʻi 'Ōlelo (Hawaiian language) for Arcturus, the brightest star in the northern hemisphere.

On Sharing The Struggle

As we celebrate Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. and reflect on his legacy, I thought it'd be fitting to share a few Native Hawai'ian voices continuing in the struggle for equality.

Listening to these voices is especially fitting since Friday, January 17th was the 121st anniversary of the illegal overthrow of the Kingdom of Hawai'i. Twenty-eight years after the abolition of slavery, United States forces invaded Honolulu to protect the interests of wealthy business owners from Queen Lili‘uokalani's attempts to undo the Bayonet Constitution of 1887.

Injustice is injustice, regardless of the people forced to live in its legacy. By sharing our stories, we share in the struggle against injustice and discrimination. I'm still figuring out my own story, so while I continue with that difficult work, here are a few things that I think are worth mentioning:

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